time out market montreal

Time Out Market just opened its first location in Canada

The epic food hall chain Time Out has just opened its first ever Canadian location, so prepare to eat your face off, Montreal. 

Seventeen different vendors are now slinging their delicious eats out of Time Out Market Montreal, which officially launched today. 

Located at the Centre Eaton de Montreal in the heart of the downtown 514, this 40,000-square-foot food extravaganza will be open every day. 

You'll have all your bases covered at this chic food court: grab turbot tacos from legendary food truck Grumman '78, or Neapolitan-style pizza from Moleskine if you're craving some margherita.

Marusan will be serving up donburi and ramen, while Vietnamese spot Le Red Tiger brings bahm ni and pho dip to the mix. 

There's a slew of notable Montreal chefs working out of Time Out too, including the pioneering Quebecois chef Normand Laprise

Three different bars (yes, three) will be pouring cocktails, pints from Quebecois microbreweries and wines. The space also includes a demo kitchen, retail shop, and a stage. 

According to the Market, prices for meals will range from $3 to $18. 

The idea for the Time Out Market, which was launched by the London-based global publication, first began in Lisbon in 2014, and has since expanded to cities like Miami, Boston, and New York. 

This is Canada's first Time Out Market but hopefully not its last.

Lead photo by

Arose PR


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