shamrock shake canada

McDonald's just brought back the Shamrock Shake in Canada

The beloved Shamrock Shake from McDonald’s has been a fan favourite in both Canada and the U.S. for several decades, and the special menu item is now back in stock for a limited time. 

The vanilla-mint shake was created by Hal Rosen — a Connecticut McDonald’s owner and operator —  in 1967 in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day.

It debuted in select locations across the U.S. in 1970 and was an instant success.

In 1974, just four years after the shake first became available to McDonald's customers, sales from the item helped fund the very first Ronald McDonald House in Philadelphia as a way to help families with sick children.

Now, 50 years after its initial release, the iconic menu item is back in its original form as well as with a special twist. 

Between now and March 8, customers in Canada can purchase the original Shamrock Shake or the new Oreo Shamrock McFlurry, made with vanilla soft serve and the distinct Shamrock flavour as well as Oreo cookie pieces.

"Every year customers eagerly await the return of the Shamrock Shake — and over the past five decades, getting a sip of this green legend has become a seasonal tradition for many," said McDonald’s Archivist Mike Bullington in a statement.

"The shake’s unique history and wide spread passion for this menu item has qualified the Shamrock Shake as a beloved cultural icon. We feel lucky to have such dedicated Shamrock fanatics, and hope to continue the legacy of this legendary treat for many more years to come."

Lead photo by

snackgator


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