cream of wheat logo

Cream of Wheat is the latest grocery staple reviewing its racist logo and packaging

Cream of Wheat just became the latest brand to announce that it would review its racist logo and packaging, following the lead of fellow American brands Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben's.

The porridge brand's logo — which prominently features a smiling Black man in a chef's hat, believed to be based on Chicago chef Frank L. White — came under fire on Wednesday, with dozens of people taking to social media to demand change.

Parent company B&G Foods said that they are "initiating an immediate review" of the packaging in a statement issued Wednesday.

"We understand there are concerns regarding the Chef image, and we are committed to evaluating our packaging and will proactively take steps to ensure that we and our brands do not inadvertently contribute to systemic racism," the company said in the statement.

B&G Foods added that they "unequivocally" stand against prejudice and injustice of any kind.

Like Aunt Jemima's packaging, the Cream of Wheat logo was originally based on a racist caricature of Black Americans. Early Cream of Wheat advertisements featured Rastus, a slow-witted former slave who spoke in broken English.

Rastus is now recognized as a racial slur.

Conagra Foods also announced on Wednesday that it would begin "a complete brand and packaging review" on the Mrs. Butterworth's line of syrup, which was reportedly modeled on a 20th-century Black actress.

Lead photo by

Cream of Wheat


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