vancouver child free ads

Controversial new ads in Vancouver promote small or child-free families

If you live in Vancouver, you might come across some controversial signs advertising for small or child-free families. 

The signs, which have started to pop up in multiple areas across the city, are part of a campaign called One Planet, One Child by U.S. group World Population Balance, to encourage single-child families or families with no children. 

The group's website says that the ad campaign is raising awareness for overpopulation to speed progress toward a "small family norm."

They even went on to explain why they chose to put their ads up in Vancouver in particular. 

"Human overpopulation is present in Vancouver just as it is in most parts of the world. Everyone around the world needs to be aware of this crisis, because we all have a role to play in resolving it," the website states. 

In an interview with Freshdaily, executive director Dave Gardner added that they are running the ads to start a conversation about overpopulation. 

"People have avoided the subject of overpopulation for so long and there really isn't widespread knowledge that we have a human overpopulation crisis," he said.

"We're confident that if people know the facts they'll be a lot more comfortable talking about it and addressing it. We really can solve that part of the sustainability problem that doesn't have to take hundreds of years and the solution is ethical."

Of course, the ads have sparked quite a bit of controversy and many have taken to Twitter to voice their concerns. 

"I chose not to have kids, but this advertising campaign is bordering on a human rights issue, no? Seems kind of messed up," someone else wrote.

"As a single child, I can tell you that is the worst gift you can give a child. Have none or have 2. 1 is no fun," another Twitter user added.

The criticism was not unexpected, Gardner said.

"In some respects, that's valuable because it really does get people talking about it and if we can have a conversation, hopefully, we can allay any misconceptions."

World Population Balance also has ads in cities across the United States. 

Lead photo by

World Population Balance


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