healthiest canada

Here's which provinces in Canada are home to the healthiest people

Much like Tim Hortons doughnuts, not all regions in Canada are made equal — and only one can claim the title of having the healthiest people.

Fortunately, the Conference Board of Canada has put together a report based on health indicator profiles to officially determine which Canadian region has the healthiest population.

Just make sure to take the report with a grain of salt; the findings came out in 2015, so it doesn't factor in any health issues related to the pandemic.

With that in mind, here's which Canadian provinces and territories have the fittest residents, ranked from the least healthy to the most healthy.

13. Nunavut

About half of Nunavut residents admit to having a cigarette daily, leading to poor health. Roughly one-third of the population (27 per cent) is also classified as obese.

Nunavut's life expectancy at birth is only 71.8 years — about a decade shorter than the national average.

12. Northwest Territories

Like its northern neighbours, the Northwest Territories suffers from high smoking rates, respiratory illnesses, and obesity.

The study notes that poor socio-economic conditions and a lack of access to fresh fruit and vegetables could play a role.

The territory has a life expectancy of 77.1 years.

11. Yukon

The territory has one of the lowest suicide rates in Canada, but loses points when it comes to life expectancy and cancer-related deaths.

Yukon has a life expectancy of 77.4 years.

10. Newfoundland and Labrador

Residents give the province a thumbs-up when it comes to self-reported mental health, but Newfoundland takes a hit when it comes to its high diabetes death rate.

The province has a life expectancy of 79.9 years.

9. Saskatchewan

The province does pretty well on cancer mortality and respiratory disease, but its high rate of infant mortality leads to its low ranking among the provinces.

The province has a life expectancy of 79.7 years.

8. Manitoba

Yikes, Manitoba; the province has the highest rate of infant mortality out of Canada's provinces (not territories, however), but its low rate of respiratory disease, suicide and heart disease bump it above Saskatchewan.

The province has a life expectancy of 79.8 years.

7. Nova Scotia

The province does extremely well when it comes to self-reported health (probably because lucky residents get to see Theodore Tugboat cruising around the water), but its high cancer mortality rate drags its score down.

The province has a life expectancy of 80.2 years.

6. New Brunswick

New Brunswick does very well for self-reported health, but it takes a hit when it comes to its high diabetes and cancer mortality rates.

The province has a life expectancy of 81.1 years.

5. Alberta

The province scores highly on self-reported health, and it takes the silver medal when it comes to cancer mortality, ranking just behind British Columbia.

Alberta loses points for its high rate of infant mortality and stroke/heart disease.

The province has a life expectancy of 81.3 years.

4. Prince Edward Island

The province claims second place when it comes to the lowest suicide rate (after Ontario), but it loses points for its high rate of cancer mortality, as well as its below-average life expectancy.

The province has a life expectancy of 80.7 years.

3. Quebec

The home of poutine gets an A+ when it comes to self-reported health and heart disease, but the province stumbles slightly when it comes to cancer mortality (particularly lung cancer).

The province has a life expectancy of 81.8 years.

2. Ontario

Canada's most populous province claims the silver medal, boasting the second-highest life expectancy in the country. It also has Canada's lowest suicide rate.

Ontario loses points when it comes to high diabetes mortality and infant mortality (about 5 deaths per 1,000 live births).

The province has a life expectancy of 82.0 years, putting it above the national average.

1. British Columbia

It's no surprise that the home of Lululemon gets top marks when it comes to health; B.C. residents are expected to live to a ripe age of 82.2 years — one of the highest life expectancies in the world.

The province also has a low rate of diabetes, respiratory diseases, heart disease and stroke.

Lead photo by

Alexander Redl


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