Maligne Canyon Ice Walk

This ice walk in Canada lets you marvel at giant frozen waterfalls

Maligne Canyon has long been dazzling visitors of Jasper National Park. Most admire the beauty of the iconic canyon from bridges and walking trails during the summer, but what if we told you that you could see it from an entirely new perspective this winter?

Instead of just peering down into the canyon, you can walk on the icy floor and experience the magical winter wonderland that’s found inside the deepest accessible canyon in the Canadian Rockies.

The guided ice walk leads hikers through four kilometres of ice caves and sculptures impressively crafted by Mother Nature herself, along the upper edge of the canyon and over bridges that offer spectacular views.

The three-hour experience also includes explorations of an underground cave system entrance and the canyon’s centuries-old fossils.

Once inside the canyon walls, discover the formerly flowing waterfalls beautifully frozen in motion and extending down the limestone of the nearly 100-foot chasm. Some have been frozen mid-flow and are transformed into a magnificent cascade of icy daggers.

These waterfalls-turned-ice sculptures are not only glorious to look at, they also make the canyon a favourite spot for ice climbers. Anyone daring enough to make the climb up these gigantic ice formations can try!

This is easily one of the most intriguing canyons in the Rockies with hundreds of fossils, and your local guide will let you in on all of the interesting geological and historical facts there is to know throughout the tour.

The coral imprints and ripple marks of waves in the rock have been left behind from the lake that existed millions of years ago on the very same area where Maligne Canyon sits today.

Whether you go during the day or choose to take the evening tour and experience the ice walk in the ambience of twilight, this is sure to be an outstanding winter adventure like no other.

Lead photo by

thelostgirlsguide


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