plant-based food

Canada investing $100 million into plant-based food industry

Plant-based food is having a moment in Canada; major chains like A&W, Subway and Wendy's have all rolled-out meat alternatives in the last few years, and it seems that the federal government has taken notice of the surge in interest.

On Monday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that Canada will invest almost $100 million into plant-based foods.

The money will go to Merit Functional Foods in Winnipeg, a company dedicated to creating pea, canola and blended proteins.

Speaking to reporters outside of Rideau Cottage, Trudeau said that the investment will create "good, well-paying jobs" in Canada.

"As people around the world start eating more plant-based products, we have an opportunity to bring together Canadian innovation and Canadian crops," he said.

Trudeau also said that the investment will support Canadian farmers that produce the canola and yellow peas that Merit uses to create their protein powders.

Merit Functional Foods will be the first facility in the world with the capability to produce food-grade canola protein ready and safe for human consumption.

The plant is scheduled to be fully operational in December 2020, creating 80 new jobs.

Minister of Agriculture Marie-Claude Bibeau said in a press release that the agricultural innovations at Merit Functional Foods will give Canada a "competitive advantage" in the global marketplace.

"This is a very exciting project that demonstrates our Government`s commitment to positioning Canada as a leader in production of plant proteins," she said.

Lead photo by

Hector Vasquez


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